Life Back Then

My father’s gardens

Manjula Mathur was born to Bengali parents in Kolkata on 29th May 1955. Her father was an Indian Army doctor, and her mother a home-maker. She travelled extensively in India with her parents, and lived in quaint, closely-knit Cantonments. She served in the Indian Defence Accounts Service, and retired in 2015. She is married to Satish, who retired from the Indian Police Service. She is a devoted mother to her sons Sachit and Suchir, and daughter-in-law Pankhuri. Manjula is an enthusiastic bird watcher and bird photographer. Her bird photos have been published in her book Bird's Abode. She lives in Mumbai and Poona.

In our childhood and early adult years, we lived in a succession of Barrack-type Army bungalows in diverse Cantonment towns such as Allahabad, Poona and Alwar. As my father ascended the rank hierarchy, we graduated to more modern duplex houses with garden spaces at Tenga Valley in Arunachal Pradesh and lastly at Bhatinda in Punjab. The common thread through all these residences spread over various corners of our large and beautiful country was the presence of verdant and fragrant gardens due to the efforts of one member of our family - our father.

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Memories of Amritsar Medical School

Dr. Prabodh K Gupta attended Government Medical College Amritsar, and the All-India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, with additional training at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. He specialized in Cytopathology. He was a professor at the Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Pennsylvania, from where retired in 2016. He is recognized internationally as a gifted clinician, educator and investigator. He has received numerous awards, including the highest awards by the American Society of Cytopathology (The George Papanicollou Award) and the International Academy of Cytology (Maurice Goldblatt Gold Medal).

Editor's Note: This is an excerpt from the author's book My India My America: Success Yatra available on Amazon.

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An American Missionary in India – Silver Years of Service

The Rev. Carl C. Herrmann (1879-1968), a Methodist missionary, went to Jabalpur, India in 1908. After several years, he became principal of the Bible Training School (now Leonard Theological College) and superintendent of the Khandwa District. Mr. Herrmann went to the Philippines in 1920, and returned to India in 1927. He became superintendent of Aligarh district. His first wife died after a year of marriage. His second wife, Florence, served with him from 1910 until her death in 1944. They had four children, three boys and a girl. In 1947, Mr. Herrmann married Lahuna Clinton, a missionary in India since 1910. They returned to the US when he retired in 1948.

Editor’s note: This material has been provided by Camy Rea, who is a descendant of the Herrmann family.

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A Letter from an American Missionary in India - 1944

The Rev. Carl C. Herrmann (1879-1968), a Methodist missionary, went to Jabalpur, India in 1908. After several years, he became principal of the Bible Training School (now Leonard Theological College) and superintendent of the Khandwa District. Mr. Herrmann went to the Philippines in 1920, and returned to India in 1927. He became superintendent of Aligarh district. His first wife died after a year of marriage. His second wife, Florence, served with him from 1910 until her death in 1944. They had four children, three boys and a girl. In 1947, Mr. Herrmann married Lahuna Clinton, a missionary in India since 1910. They returned to the US when he retired in 1948.

Editor’s note: This material has been provided by Camy Rea, who is a descendant of the Herrmann family.

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August 1947 – Azadi (Freedom)

Chandra Sayal née Hooja is a retired doctor, now living in Derby, England. She worked for over 30 years in the NHS in UK. She was a specialist in Community Medicine and Public Health.

Each year on 15th August when Independence Day is celebrated, most people are not even aware of the price their elders paid to get freedom. Of course, it is an occasion to celebrate, because after years of struggle, Indians were at last successful in attaining freedom. It is a cause of rejoicing since they were able to free from the clutches of the foreign rule. I am glad for the younger generations, who are now able to have their own laws, own rules, own government and freedom without being dictated by the foreigners. They must rejoice because they are now able to have own president, own prime minister, own ministers. They should be happy because they are now a free people in a free country with an end of foreign rule.

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